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Old 09-22-2003, 05:15 PM   #1
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Dear travellers to Peru I hope this web help You and anothers is not finish yet so we are waintig for any suggestion to make this web more useful to You an anothers any other help just drop us on line
TRAVEL
What does the traveller to PERU really need to know? What should you bring? Where should you go? There are plenty of websites out there that will recommend that you don't drink the water, never venture out after dark, and so on. These are generic websites written for all parts of the world. Rather than making the same recommendations for Brazil, Japan and Afghanistan, PERUTOURISTINFORMATION is a focused on Peru, provides accurate information about the current state of Peru and about studying and travelling in the country.
One thing that is true when travelling anywhere is that you should leave behind your preconceptions and prejudices - and enjoy the difference.
Safety and the law
The truth is, Peru is a very safe country, and you can relax while you are here. There is no reason to worry excessively about theft, violence or other crimes. That being said, it is always necessary to be careful when travelling abroad, and Peru is no exception - you can easily cause yourself problems or find trouble in Peru as you can anywhere. Peru is a society in the process of profound and far-reaching changes, and while this means that it is a very interesting time to spend in the country, it also means that in recent years the former perception of Peru as a completely safe society has been dented.
As in any developed country, you should take the usual precautions when you do not know the area. Women out alone after dark should take care or use a yelow taxis, or taxi form the htls self if possible. There are plenty of police boxes (Municipality private ) around major cities in case you do experience trouble, and the police are almost exclusively friendly and helpful when you're on the right side of the law. Don't expect too much English or other languages to be spoken, however! Peru is quite safe, well shit can happen anywhere, so use your common sense and you will be fine. My advice will be to be careful on the bus rides, specially on cheap buses, with your stuffs (the ones you take with you into the bus, not the ones you store). Ask for a receipt when you store your big bagpack in the bus.
My second advice, leave your passport in the safe of the hotel, also the credit cards and traveller checks you won't use. Why to take the risk when you can avoid the hassle of loose your passport and money. Always ask for a receipt when you leave stuffs in the safe of a hotel.
My final advice, try to stay in a hotel near the mainsquare of the main cities as Cusco, Puno, Arequipa. So you won't need to take taxis to the hotel when you go out at night.

Do take care, however - avoid any contact with drugs, and try to avoid getting into trouble with the police in Peru as laws are quite strict: you can be detained for up to 23 days without charge, which could make a mess of any holiday. Laws regarding drugs are harsh, so do not get involved in any way whatsoever.
Health
The water in taps virtually anywhere is safe to drink, although it generally has more in common with a swimming pool than a mountain spring. Some rural areas may not have purified water, but in these cases it will usually be marked "Mineral Water " (well-water) or someone will point this out to you. You can safely drink the water in all cities and towns, and there is generally no need to worry about food either - although there are always exceptions. If a restaurant looks like somewhere you wouldn't want to eat, don't.
Make sure that you get travel insurance before you come to Peru. Hospital treatment is expensive, so if you are coming even for a short stay, you should take out a good policy before leaving. For longer stays with a student visa, you can apply for national health insurance through your school or university.
THE GUIDE
Check through this section for generally anything that is useful for the traveller. Keep up to date with new events and news by checking the top page of the site or subscribe to the newsletter. Details of getting around Peru are in the Transport section, and a brief guide to the vagaries of Peru Accommodation and Food & Drink can be fairly helpful for the uninitiated.
A guide to the Art & Culture of Peru is intended as a brief explanation of some of the things to look out for, not an in-depth analysis; similarly the History aims to give you a general overview so that you have a rough idea what sort of country you're heading into. finally, a simple explanation of the Language might help you learn a little about what Peru is, even if you decide not to do anything else about it. See the Regional Guide for some of the more interesting things that you should see (new articles added constantly). Feel free to contribute any suggestions you have of worthwhile places to visit.
One thing that is true when travelling anywhere is that you should leave behind your preconceptions and prejudices - and enjoy the difference.
What to Bring
What you bring to Peru will depend on what you want to do and how long you will stay. There is no need to bring large supplies of soap and toilet paper, razors and such like - these are of course all available in Peru . What you will need to consider:
A Japanese phrasebook/dictionary: if you can, bring a small Peru phrasebook and Peru - English - Peru dictionary. Electronic dictionaries are excellent and lightweight.
Shoes: if you take over about 27cm shoes, you may have little choice in Peru . Although not as bad as it used to be, it is still difficult to find larger sizes outside of the major cities. Bring spares if planning a long-term stay.
Clothing is less of a problem, but if you take extremely large clothing, again you may have a limited choice in Peru.
Try to find out about your accommodation if you are staying long term - accommodation can be cramped, particularly if you are staying in a large city, so you might want to bring less with you.
Peru can be a little expensive if you are coming short term, but if you stay longer and work, salaries are generally poor and you can't easily buy most of your requirements in the country. If you are coming short term, you should consider bringing more with you if on a limited budget.
Sinceraly
A big Peruvian hug
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Old 09-22-2003, 06:28 PM   #2
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That is a WICKED play by play Mazamorra, and I am sure it will help many peoplewho are makeing the trek to Peru, South America is on my list of the next place I will travel to, so I will maybe be getting in touch with you for some help on planning!!!



The cautions you mentioned are great info for trav'las who are going to any place in the world as no country is free of crimes, and crimes against tourists more specifically.

Your post on Peru is a great addition to the South America Forum!!!



A Big TravelPunk Welcome 2 You!! and a Canadian Hug from me!!!

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Old 09-22-2003, 08:30 PM   #3
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WOW good stuff!
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Old 09-22-2003, 09:38 PM   #4
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mazamorra-your my inspiration. if only i had that sort of energy! peru is also on my list of places. hmmm a tp.com get together! I want to go to macchu pacchu or however it's spelled.
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Old 09-28-2003, 11:47 PM   #5
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Damn Mazamorra! That was the motherload! Thanks for that! Man, I'd love to hit Machu piccu(spelling?)! Who want's to organize a group trip ?!
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Old 11-14-2003, 11:20 AM   #6
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i am going to Peru in about a week and was wondering if work (under the table) is easy to find. i do not speak hardly any spanish and i was wondering if it would be a problem. replies are not excluded just to Peru. i am interested in surrounding countires as well. thanks.

p.s.- i did a search and found nothing on this topic so i have covered my ass.


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Old 11-14-2003, 09:59 PM   #7
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Machu Picchu! Right on! I've wanted to climb the Inca Trail since I was in like Gr.7. But I'm not going to Peru for 2 or 3 years I don't think...what a wait. This thing money...well, I don't have it.
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Old 11-16-2003, 07:00 AM   #8
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My rents actually lived in Peru in the '60s! We still have some really cool Peruvian furniture!
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Old 11-16-2003, 07:15 AM   #9
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Count me in on a trip to Macchu Picchu! I've wanted to go there for quite some time, and actually had two trips planned and set up to go there. Both times my coworkers backed out on me and convinced me to wait and go with them "later."

I should have said "sorry" and gone...stupid, stupid!

Anyway, I'm in on a Peruvian adventure...hiking the Inca Trail sounds like a blast!

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Old 11-16-2003, 10:42 AM   #10
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could someone tell me if it is a good idea to take a tent. i'm not sure what to do, i just dont want to carry around something that i will only use a couple times. and is it easy to get a tent into the country?? when i was in New Zealand they were quite worried about the whole tent thing upon entering customs. i didnt have one on me so i never really found out why. i guess all camping gear must be checked. tell me something good! :D
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Old 11-16-2003, 02:21 PM   #11
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Hey jteichgrab!!! :D

About the tent...Well, I am a camping freak and I had brought my entire camping gear in Bulgaria...It turned out I never camped, and carried this stuff around for 1 1/2 month for nothing! If you intend on camping, then bring your tent...If you're not sure and think maybe it would be cool to camp, I suggest you leave it at home! All I know is, on my next trip, my pack will be much lighter without it!
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Old 11-16-2003, 02:38 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mocassin@Nov 16 2003, 10:21 PM
Hey jteichgrab!!! :D

About the tent...Well, I am a camping freak and I had brought my entire camping gear in Bulgaria...It turned out I never camped, and carried this stuff around for 1 1/2 month for nothing! If you intend on camping, then bring your tent...If you're not sure and think maybe it would be cool to camp, I suggest you leave it at home! All I know is, on my next trip, my pack will be much lighter without it!
i think you right. thanks
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Old 11-17-2003, 09:42 AM   #13
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Hahah! Hey! I'm always right!
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Old 11-17-2003, 11:45 AM   #14
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another thing i just thought about is the Puruvian/Ecuadorian boarder. is it safe, or does it take a long time to cross. not sure what i should be asking but anything you could tell me would be great.
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Old 10-19-2007, 09:42 AM   #15
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Question

I have a fascination with ancient giant stone monoliths.

Pyramids (Egyptian & South American, etc), Stonehenge, Easter Island...and Sacsayhuaman ("Satisfied Falcon" in Quechua but "House of the Sun" in Incan times), near Cuzco, Peru. These enormous stone blocks are precision-cut to fit together seamlessly - and some weigh up to 450 tons!!! The tallest one is 28' high! And since they are interlocked and lean inwards, they are earthquake-proof. They also form the head of a puma when viewed from above...and also contain an extensive system of underground passages known as chincanas!

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The wonderfully carved granite walls of the temple were covered with more than 700 sheets of pure gold, weighing around two kilograms each; the spacious courtyard was filled with life-size sculptures of animals and a field of corn, all fashioned from pure gold; the floors of the temple were themselves covered in solid gold; and facing the rising sun was a massive golden image of the sun encrusted with emeralds and other precious stones. (All of this golden artwork was quickly stolen and melted down by the Spaniards, who then built a church of Santo Domingo on foundations of the temple.)
Has anyone been here or have any idea how or why it was built?
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Old 10-19-2007, 12:51 PM   #16
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Way to revive an old thread, dude!

PS. I have no idea about them, sorry!
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Old 10-19-2007, 02:24 PM   #17
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What's really funny is that the original post would now be considered spammy, but back in the day it was valued information. Interesting how things change.
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Old 10-19-2007, 02:33 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voyd View Post
These enormous stone blocks are precision-cut to fit together seamlessly - and some weigh up to 450 tons!!! The tallest one is 28' high!

The coolest part about Inca structures is that they did not use the wheel...so all of the stonework you see in Peru is either carved from stone already at the location or was moved by hand. The Incas were known for incorporating local rock formations into their architecture, but the relocated stone is in a lot of cases huge, its hard to believe they could move it without the wheel!
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Old 10-19-2007, 03:18 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by space virgin View Post
What's really funny is that the original post would now be considered spammy, but back in the day it was valued information. Interesting how things change.
yeah I never look at dates of threads, I just post, so before I saw this was an old thread, I was like wtf isn't this spam?
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Old 11-04-2007, 06:56 AM   #20
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After spending 5 months in Peru and reading this post, there was one BIG thing that jumped out at me....which I want to make sure is clear here:

I don't know ANY locals that ever drank tap water without boiling it first....and actually, most drank bottled water. I would say that's fair to say for Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador.
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